GALAPAGOS ANIMALS

Probably in the world, there is no other place to closely appreciate animals like the Galapagos Islands. Unesco declared it in 1978 as a Natural Heritage of Humanity due to the proximity with which you can admire and live with the species that will take you to a paradisiacal and peaceful environment.

Galápagos Tortoise

The largest of the tortoises, the endangered Galápagos tortoise is incredibly long-lived. One captive tortoise lived over 150 years.

Blue-Footed Booby

Not just attractive physical features, the blue feet of this booby can be used to cover its chicks and keep them warm.

Bottlenose Dolphin

Their intelligence, friendly disposition, and «smiling» faces make dolphins popular among free divers, snorkelers, divers.

Hammerhead Shark

Hammerheads are aggressive hunters, feeding on smaller fish, octopuses, squid, and crustaceans. They do not actively seek out human prey, but are very defensive and will attack when provoked.

Red-Footed Booby

Smallest of the boobies, the red-foot feeds at sea, nests on the ground, and perches in coastal trees.

Sea Turtle

Green sea turtles are reptiles whose ancestors evolved on land and took to the sea to live about 150 million years ago. They are one of the few species so ancient that they watched the dinosaurs evolve and become extinct.

Black-Browed Albatross

Wide-winged and long-lived, albatrosses are rarely seen on land, preferring to stay out on the ocean except to mate and raise their young.

Marine Iguana

Found only on the Galápagos Islands, marine iguanas often wear distinctive white «wigs» of salt expelled from glands near their noses.

Sea Lion

The Galápagos sea lion is a species of sea lion that breeds on the Galápagos Islands and, in smaller numbers, on Isla de la Plata. Being fairly social, they are often spotted sun-bathing on sandy shores or rock groups or gliding gracefully through the surf. 

Whale Shark

For the best chance of seeing a whale shark in the Galapagos, head to the open water around Wolf and Darwin Islands between June and December. Here, they can be seen between 6 and 60 feet (2 and 20 meters) under the water’s surface as they feed along rocky outcrops.

Manta Ray

The giant oceanic manta ray, giant manta ray, or oceanic manta ray, is a species of ray in the family Mobulidae, and the largest type of ray in the world. It is circumglobal and is typically found in tropical and subtropical waters, but can also be found in temperate waters.

Galapagos Shark

The Galapagos shark is a species of requiem shark, in the family Carcharhinidae, found worldwide. It favors clear reef environments around oceanic islands, where it is often the most abundant shark species.

Black tip Shrak

The blacktip shark is a species of requiem shark, and part of the family Carcharhinidae. It is common to coastal tropical and subtropical waters around the world, including brackish habitats.

Seahorse

The Galapagos Seahorse can grow up to 30 cm long and they can be seen while snorkelling at Los Tuneles and Roca Vicente in Isabela Island. The Seahorse belongs to the same class as other bony fish. However, their head resembles a horse, thus giving it its name.

Frigate

There are two species in the Galapagos: the Magnificent and the Great frigate bird. The Great frigate bird is also found in other pacific regions and the Indian Ocean and tends to forage far out in the sea to avoid competition. They have a green sheen on the scapular feathers and have a white collar on the neck.

Galapagos Owl

The short-eared owl is a widespread grassland species in the. Owls belonging to genus Asio are known as the eared owls, as they have tufts of feathers resembling mammalian ears. These «ear» tufts may or may not be visible.

Galapagos Hawk

The Galapagos hawk can range from 45 to 58 cm (18 to 23 in) in length from beak to tail with a wingspan of 116 to 140 cm (46 to 55 in).

Galapagos Snake

Found only on the Galápagos Islands, marine iguanas often wear distinctive white «wigs» of salt expelled from glands near their noses.

Land Iguana

The Galápagos land iguana is a species of lizard in the family Iguanidae. It is one of three species of the genus Conolophus. It is endemic to the Galápagos Islands, in the dry lowlands of Fernandina, Isabela, Santa Cruz, North Seymour, Baltra, and South Plaza Islands.

Galápagos Tortoise

The largest of the tortoises, the endangered Galápagos tortoise is incredibly long-lived. One captive tortoise lived over 150 years.

Blue-Footed Booby

Not just attractive physical features, the blue feet of this booby can be used to cover its chicks and keep them warm.

Bottlenose Dolphin

Their intelligence, friendly disposition, and «smiling» faces make dolphins popular among free divers, snorkelers, divers.

Hammerhead Shark

Hammerheads are aggressive hunters, feeding on smaller fish, octopuses, squid, and crustaceans. They do not actively seek out human prey, but are very defensive and will attack when provoked.

Red-Footed Booby

Smallest of the boobies, the red-foot feeds at sea, nests on the ground, and perches in coastal trees.

Sea Turtle

Green sea turtles are reptiles whose ancestors evolved on land and took to the sea to live about 150 million years ago. They are one of the few species so ancient that they watched the dinosaurs evolve and become extinct.

Black-Browed Albatross

Wide-winged and long-lived, albatrosses are rarely seen on land, preferring to stay out on the ocean except to mate and raise their young.

Marine Iguana

Found only on the Galápagos Islands, marine iguanas often wear distinctive white «wigs» of salt expelled from glands near their noses.

Sea Lion

Found only on the Galápagos Islands, marine iguanas often wear distinctive white «wigs» of salt expelled from glands near their noses.

Whale Shark

For the best chance of seeing a whale shark in the Galapagos, head to the open water around Wolf and Darwin Islands between June and December. Here, they can be seen between 6 and 60 feet (2 and 20 meters) under the water’s surface as they feed along rocky outcrops.

Manta Ray

The giant oceanic manta ray, giant manta ray, or oceanic manta ray, is a species of ray in the family Mobulidae, and the largest type of ray in the world. It is circumglobal and is typically found in tropical and subtropical waters, but can also be found in temperate waters.

Galapagos Shark

The Galapagos shark is a species of requiem shark, in the family Carcharhinidae, found worldwide. It favors clear reef environments around oceanic islands, where it is often the most abundant shark species.

Black tip Shark

The blacktip shark is a species of requiem shark, and part of the family Carcharhinidae. It is common to coastal tropical and subtropical waters around the world, including brackish habitats.

Seahorse

The Galapagos Seahorse can grow up to 30 cm long and they can be seen while snorkelling at Los Tuneles and Roca Vicente in Isabela Island. The Seahorse belongs to the same class as other bony fish. However, their head resembles a horse, thus giving it its name.

Frigate

There are two species in the Galapagos: the Magnificent and the Great frigate bird. The Great frigate bird is also found in other pacific regions and the Indian Ocean and tends to forage far out in the sea to avoid competition. They have a green sheen on the scapular feathers and have a white collar on the neck.

Galapagos Owl

The short-eared owl is a widespread grassland species in the. Owls belonging to genus Asio are known as the eared owls, as they have tufts of feathers resembling mammalian ears. These «ear» tufts may or may not be visible.

Galapagos Hawk

The Galapagos hawk can range from 45 to 58 cm (18 to 23 in) in length from beak to tail with a wingspan of 116 to 140 cm (46 to 55 in).

Galapagos Snake

Racer snakes on Galapagos are constrictors and only mildly venomous. They are known to prey on lava lizards, geckos, insects, iguanas, mice, rats and hatchlings of several bird species.This is a unique behaviour of terrestrial snake not observed anywhere else in the world.

Land Iguana

The Galápagos land iguana is a species of lizard in the family Iguanidae. It is one of three species of the genus Conolophus. It is endemic to the Galápagos Islands, in the dry lowlands of Fernandina, Isabela, Santa Cruz, North Seymour, Baltra, and South Plaza Islands.

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